Fossil fuel is something I adore.

No, I didn’t fall and bump my head.   And no, the Koch brothers did not send a good squad to my house.

It’s just important to be honest.

I love my tools.   I never get tired of what they can do.   Fossil fuel provides the power to run them.   Fossil fuel also provided probably almost all the power to fabricate them.

I enjoy being a guy with a truck.   My truck is small, so it’s not the size thing.    I like not spending any time thinking about how to get something big from one place to another.   If a friend needs a ladder, or to get a couch from their Mom’s to their sisters, or my wife wants 12 bags of mulch, I can say “Sure, no problem.”    This would not be possible without fossil fuels.

(I am now envisioning this blog post generating lots of requests to help people move.   Honesty has its cost).

My wife is from Denmark, and all her family lives there.   Especially during Christmastime, she starts longing to go home.   Without fossil fuels, we don’t get there.   Without fossil fuels, she never sees her family again.

It’s easy to say “Keep the carbon in the ground” when you think that this is something the oil companies and the coal industry should be doing.   It’s difficult to say it when your kid is struggling in college and asks to be flown home for Easter.    It’s not so easy to say it when it’s been 15 below for two weeks straight, and you see an ad for a cheap flight to the Bahamas.   It’s more or less impossible to say it when your uncle needs a kidney and one is available in Cleveland.

I like bananas, as do many Americans.   The United States consumes 6.4 billion pounds of bananas a year.   In the store the other day, the organic free trade ones came from Peru.   The regular ones came from Costa Rica.    Interestingly, Cost Rica recently went 75 days running solely on renewable energy.    Refrigerated cargo vessels can run on bunker fuel, the leftovers from refining crude oil, which helps keep bananas inexpensive but also means they are carbon intensive.

 

  • 1
  • 2